An Alternative Royal Wedding!

This resource is great for:
Getting your pupils choosing or composing poetry inspired by Harry and Meghan’s nuptials.

Summary:
Writing activities to help you stage your own royal wedding!


Introduction

Whether you’re a royalist or not – everyone loves a wedding! Make the most of the subject that’s on everyone’s lips this week by choosing or writing your own poems, be they love lyrics or protest songs…


Activities

Part One – Discussion

Start by discussing the Royal wedding and the Royal family with your class. Will they be watching? What are their feelings on it? How do they feel about the money being spent on such a celebration?

There may be mixed opinions in your class – encourage pupils to be as controversial, political or passionate as they want!

Part Two – Wedding Ceremony

Allocate different roles to the pupils in your class: Harry, Meghan, William, the Queen, the Archbishop of Canterbury, plus any others you would like.

As a class, prepare vows for Harry and Meghan, and readings for some of the guests. You could either write some poems yourselves or research poetry that your pupils feel would be fit for a wedding ceremony. It doesn’t have to be traditional – encourage pupils to look at lots of different types of poetry.

Prepare some lines for the person conducting the ceremony as the Archbishop of Canterbury (or other leader of your choice). Either write these yourselves or find something appropriate online.

When you’ve prepared the script for the wedding, clear the classroom/school hall and move your chairs into rows. Then you can recreate the wedding ceremony! How dramatic you get is up to you – music, costumes and props could really add to the sense of occasion.

Part Three – The Reception

Seat everyone in groups on tables, as though they’re attending a wedding breakfast. Ask your pupils to prepare speeches. They could do some research online to find out what a speech normally contains.

Traditionally, the following people perform speeches – but we’re not traditionalists at the Book Festival so the more of your pupils who can get involved the better (and please do include some speeches from women!):

The Best Man – will need to give advice to the groom on how to be a good husband, plus maybe tell a few embarrassing stories!

Father of the Bride – what will Meghan’s father think of her marrying into the British royal family?

The Couple – how did they meet? What thoughts do they want to share on their special day?

Again, be as dramatic as you want! Bring food along and maybe add some sparkling juice to use as a toast for the speeches!


Further Information

Of course, this resource can be adapted and used not just for royal weddings but perhaps to celebrate the upcoming marriage of a member of staff at your school, or other important occasion.

For more poetry prompts (of a less Royal nature), check out these resources:

https://learning.edbookfest.co.uk/resources/liz-lochhead-poetry-and-place/

https://learning.edbookfest.co.uk/resources/an-interview-with-carol-ann-duffy/

https://learning.edbookfest.co.uk/resources/edwin-morgan-a-taste-of-poetry/

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